Author: Anna Foks, Grocery Account Manager, Teapigs

Plastic-free? Biodegradable? Local? Anna Foks, Grocery Account Manager at Teapigs, boils down to the basics of sustainable tea.

With over 11 years’ experience under our belts, and a passion for reducing our own carbon footprint, we thought we’d share our top 3 tips in choosing a sustainable tea supplier.

  1.  Does your teabag contain plastic?

The majority of paper tea bags contain a small amount of plastic, making them not 100% biodegradable. We have been proudly producing plastic-free tea temples for 13 years (string ‘n all!).

Excess plastic packaging can also be a real struggle for a tea company, as freshness is crucial – but there are alternatives. Our tea temples are now packed into Natureflex – a fab material made from wood pulp that is fully compostable at home.

  1. Do you know where your tea comes from?

Our co-founder is a trained tea taster, so it’s always been top priority to source the very best tea from the best tea suppliers to ensuring we are ticking 2 important boxes.

  • Tastes yummy
  • Comes from sustainable well run estates.

There are some really simple ways to tell if your tea is sourced sustainably. Has the brand got Rainforest Alliance certification on any of their teas – helping ensure sustainable agriculture? Are they part of the Ethical Tea Partnership – a fab non-profit organisation working to improve the lives and livelihoods of tea workers and smallholder farmers, and the environment in which tea is produced?

  1. Does your tea give back to the tea growing communities?

It’s no secret that sadly tea growing communities are often some of the poorest in the world – that’s why most tea companies worth their weight will invest heavily back into the local areas.

Teapigs work closely with The Point Foundation – a wonderful charity working with vulnerable members of the tea growing communities in Gisenyi, Rwanda (an area from which we source the majority of our everyday brew). So far we’ve donated over £250k which has helped fund the ‘teapigs house’ – a safe environment for disabled youths.